History's Heroines

Badass ladies who have made their mark on history.

awelltraveledwoman:

karidevereaux:

…an ode to 1970s skater girls. 

this is amazing

(via karlkaos)

fyeah-history:

Hannie SchaftJannetje Johanna (Jo) Schaft (16 September 1920 – 17 April 1945), was a Dutch communist resistance fighter during World War II. She became known as the girl with the red hair. Her secret name in the resistance movement was Hannie.

Hannie became active during the German occupation of the Netherlands.  She joined the communist movement because they were actively resisting, and helped out by learning to speak fluent German, providing ID cards and food coupons for those hiding out.  Only 25 when she died, she was arrested at a military checkpoint for distributing an illegal communist newspaper.  She was executed by a firing squad of two men.  When the first shot failed to kill her, her reported last words were, “I shoot better than you.”  She was then killed by the second man.

fyeah-history:

Hannie Schaft
Jannetje Johanna (Jo) Schaft (16 September 1920 – 17 April 1945), was a Dutch communist resistance fighter during World War II. She became known as the girl with the red hair. Her secret name in the resistance movement was Hannie.

Hannie became active during the German occupation of the Netherlands.  She joined the communist movement because they were actively resisting, and helped out by learning to speak fluent German, providing ID cards and food coupons for those hiding out.  Only 25 when she died, she was arrested at a military checkpoint for distributing an illegal communist newspaper.  She was executed by a firing squad of two men.  When the first shot failed to kill her, her reported last words were, “I shoot better than you.”  She was then killed by the second man.

fyeah-history:

Empress Dowager CixiEmpress Dowager Cixi, of the Manchu Yehenara clan, was a powerful and charismatic woman who unofficially but effectively controlled the Manchu Qing Dynasty in China for 47 years from 1861 to her death in 1908.

Empress Dowager Cixi was a shrewd political player as well.  She was crowned Empress Dowager Cixi at 27 after the Emperor Xianfeng’s death.  Until her own death, she effectively manipulated the court into doing her will, including working over and around (and sometimes through) people that got in her way.  For example the 8 Regent Ministers, who resented what they saw as her interference in status quo politics, frequently tried to stymie her.  In retaliation, she secretly gathered allies from those the Ministers had made enemies of and staged a coup that left three of the 8 executed (she only executed 3 to show how noble she was).  This lady did not eff around.
She also suffered no BS from anyone, friends or enemies.  She had  one long-standing ally named Prince Gong - that is, until he showed too much ambition and gathered far too much military and popular support.  When he became a real threat to her rule, despite the aid he’d given her in the Xinyou Palace Coup, she cut his political feet out from under him and demoted him, allowing him to keep only an empty title without power.  He would never return to his former power again.
Dowager Empress Cixi is often vilified as a tyrannical and despotic ruler, but she did manage to control the Qing dynasty for 47 years, and most of her bad press may have been created by her opponents.  Read more about her here >

fyeah-history:

Empress Dowager Cixi
Empress Dowager Cixi, of the Manchu Yehenara clan, was a powerful and charismatic woman who unofficially but effectively controlled the Manchu Qing Dynasty in China for 47 years from 1861 to her death in 1908.

Empress Dowager Cixi was a shrewd political player as well.  She was crowned Empress Dowager Cixi at 27 after the Emperor Xianfeng’s death.  Until her own death, she effectively manipulated the court into doing her will, including working over and around (and sometimes through) people that got in her way.  For example the 8 Regent Ministers, who resented what they saw as her interference in status quo politics, frequently tried to stymie her.  In retaliation, she secretly gathered allies from those the Ministers had made enemies of and staged a coup that left three of the 8 executed (she only executed 3 to show how noble she was).  This lady did not eff around.

She also suffered no BS from anyone, friends or enemies.  She had  one long-standing ally named Prince Gong - that is, until he showed too much ambition and gathered far too much military and popular support.  When he became a real threat to her rule, despite the aid he’d given her in the Xinyou Palace Coup, she cut his political feet out from under him and demoted him, allowing him to keep only an empty title without power.  He would never return to his former power again.

Dowager Empress Cixi is often vilified as a tyrannical and despotic ruler, but she did manage to control the Qing dynasty for 47 years, and most of her bad press may have been created by her opponents.  Read more about her here >

weirdvintage:

Mystery writer Agatha Christie with her surf board “Fred” in 1922.  She was one of the earliest Britons to master stand-up surfing while visiting Hawaii. (via Retronaut)

weirdvintage:

Mystery writer Agatha Christie with her surf board “Fred” in 1922.  She was one of the earliest Britons to master stand-up surfing while visiting Hawaii. (via Retronaut)

(Source: weirdvintage)

There were no educated women: Fatima al-Fihri

medievallyaccurate:

imageCourtyard, Al-Qarawiyyin University, Fes. Morocco(by Khonsali)

Fatima Muhammad Al-Fihri (فاطمة محمد الفهري)(?-880) was an Arab Muslim woman who, along with her sister Mariam, supported the construction of several mosque and education centres, the most famous of which is the University of…

asianhistory:

 Qiu Jin (November 8, 1875 - July 15, 1907) was a Chinese anti-Qing Empire revolutionary, feminist and writer. She was executed after a failed uprising and today is considered a hero in China. “The Woman Knight of Mirror Lake.” Born in Minhou, Fujian Province, Qiu grew up in Shanyin Village, Shaoxing Subprefecture, Zhejiang Province. Married, Qiu found herself in contact with new ideas. In 1904 she decided to travel overseas and study in Japan, leaving her two children behind. She was known by her acquaintances for wearing Western male dress and for her left-wing ideology. She joined the Triads, who at the time advocated the overthrow of the Qing dynasty and return of Chinese government to the Chinese people. She joined the anti-Qing societies Guangfuhui, led by Cai Yuanpei, and the Tokyo-based Tongmenghui led by Sun Yat-sen. She returned to China in 1905. She was an eloquent orator who spoke out for women’s rights, such as the freedom to marry, freedom of education, and abolishment of bound feet. In 1906 she founded a radical women’s journal with another female poet, Xu Zihua, in Shanghai. In 1907 she became head of the Datong school in Shaoxing, ostensibly a school for sport teachers, but really intended for the military training of revolutionaries. After an uprising led by her cousin Xu Xilin failed in July 1907, Qiu was arrested in her school. She was tortured by Qing officials in order to make her reveal secrets but did not succumb; a few days later she was publicly executed in her home village, Shanyin, at the age of 31. Qiu was immortalized in Republican China’s popular consciousness and literature after her death. She is now buried beside West Lake in Hangzhou. The People’s Republic of China established a museum for her in Shaoxing City.

asianhistory:

Qiu Jin (November 8, 1875 - July 15, 1907) was a Chinese anti-Qing Empire revolutionary, feminist and writer. She was executed after a failed uprising and today is considered a hero in China. “The Woman Knight of Mirror Lake.” Born in Minhou, Fujian Province, Qiu grew up in Shanyin Village, Shaoxing Subprefecture, Zhejiang Province. Married, Qiu found herself in contact with new ideas. In 1904 she decided to travel overseas and study in Japan, leaving her two children behind. She was known by her acquaintances for wearing Western male dress and for her left-wing ideology. She joined the Triads, who at the time advocated the overthrow of the Qing dynasty and return of Chinese government to the Chinese people. She joined the anti-Qing societies Guangfuhui, led by Cai Yuanpei, and the Tokyo-based Tongmenghui led by Sun Yat-sen. She returned to China in 1905. She was an eloquent orator who spoke out for women’s rights, such as the freedom to marry, freedom of education, and abolishment of bound feet. In 1906 she founded a radical women’s journal with another female poet, Xu Zihua, in Shanghai. In 1907 she became head of the Datong school in Shaoxing, ostensibly a school for sport teachers, but really intended for the military training of revolutionaries. After an uprising led by her cousin Xu Xilin failed in July 1907, Qiu was arrested in her school. She was tortured by Qing officials in order to make her reveal secrets but did not succumb; a few days later she was publicly executed in her home village, Shanyin, at the age of 31. Qiu was immortalized in Republican China’s popular consciousness and literature after her death. She is now buried beside West Lake in Hangzhou. The People’s Republic of China established a museum for her in Shaoxing City.
femininefreak:

Did you know?
There was a “female Paul Revere” named Sybil Ludington who rode twice as far and was only 16 at the time?
Put women back into history.
Read more here…

femininefreak:

Did you know?

There was a “female Paul Revere” named Sybil Ludington who rode twice as far and was only 16 at the time?

Put women back into history.

Read more here

Anonymous said: What your opinion on Women in the Military?

peashooter85:

If a woman can meet the standards then I don’t see why not.  Today pretty much every modern military in the world allows women in combat.  The thing that gets me is that many people treat the subject like it’s something new and groundbreaking, like its never been done before. However, throughout history there have been many women who fought and did battle, many of whom were absolute badasses who make UFC heavy weight champions seem like wimpy wet noodles.

Anhotep I, Ancient Egypt, Hyksos War, “cleansed Egypt of the Hyksos”.

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Hua Mulan, Tang Dynasty China, disguised herself as a man.  Inspired the Disney movie “Mulan”.

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The Trung Sisters, 1st Century Vietnam, rebelled against the Chinese Empire.

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Joan of Arc, the Hundred Years War. Led the French to victory against the English.

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Tomoe Gozen, lady Samurai during the Genpei War.  The woodblock illustration below is of her decapitating the Samurai Honda no Moroshige of Musashi during the Battle of Awazu.

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Matilda of Tuscany, Middle Ages, Investiture Conflict, personal bodyguard of Pope.

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Hannah Snell, Royal Marine, Seven Years War, disguised herself as a man.

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Nadezhda Andreyevna Durova,  most heavily decorated soldier in the Russian Cavalry during the Napoleonic Wars. Disguised herself as a man.

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Deborah Sampson, American Revolution, disguised herself as a man. Removed a musket ball from her thigh with a knife.

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Harriet Tubman, American Civil War, spy, army scout, and co-commander of Union forces during the Combahee River Raid.

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Loretta Valsaquez, American Civil War, Confederacy. Disguised herself as a man.

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Cathay Williams, 38th Infantry (Buffalo Soldiers) during the late 19th century. Disguised herself as a man.

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The Dahomey Amazon’s, East Africa 19th century.  The most feared warriors of the Kingdom of Dahomey.  Their favorite pastime was to decapitate their captured enemies.

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One of many “Soldateras” during the Mexican Revolution.

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Captain Flora Sandes, World War I, English woman who fought in the Serbian Army.  Won the Serbia’s highest honor (the Order of the Karađorđe’s Star) after leading her company on a successful assault despite being wounded by a grenade and in a bout of hand to hand combat.

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Soldiers during the Spanish Civil War.

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Lydia Litvyak, Soviet Air Force, World War II: First female fighter ace, first kill scored by a woman, highest scoring female fighter pilot with 16 kills.

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Nancy Wake, World War II, commanded a 7,000 man resistance group in France. Was tortured by the Gestapo for 4 days and never talked.  On the flip side she was known for interrogating enemy spies and getting them to talk, then executing them.

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The 46th Taman Guards Night Bomber Group, a Soviet all female bomber group during World War II.  Nicknamed “The Night Witches” by the Germans because of their stealthy bombing tactics.

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Lyudmilla Pavlichenko, Soviet Sniper during World War II, deadliest female sniper with 309 kills. Heroine of the Soviet Union.

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Mariya Oktyabrskaya, Soviet tank driver during World War II, Heroine of the Soviet Union.

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Capt. Kim Campbell, US Air Force, A10 Warthog pilot during the Iraq War, the pictures speak for themselves.

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rebellemagazine:

Women training to be doctors at the Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in 1885

I love this picture.

rebellemagazine:

Women training to be doctors at the Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in 1885

I love this picture.

fyeah-history:

Folk art depiction of Lady TrieuLady Triệu (Vietnamese: Bà Triệu, Sino-Vietnamese: 趙嫗 Triệu Ẩu; 225–248) was a female warrior in 3rd century Vietnam who managed, for a time, to successfully resist the Chinese state of Eastern Wu during its occupation of Vietnam. She is also called Triệu Thị Trinh, although her actual given name is unknown. She is quoted as saying, “I’d like to ride storms, kill sharks in the open sea, drive out the aggressors, reconquer the country, undo the ties of serfdom, and never bend my back to be the concubine of whatever man.”

fyeah-history:

Folk art depiction of Lady Trieu
Lady Triệu (Vietnamese: Bà Triệu, Sino-Vietnamese: 趙嫗 Triệu Ẩu; 225–248) was a female warrior in 3rd century Vietnam who managed, for a time, to successfully resist the Chinese state of Eastern Wu during its occupation of Vietnam. She is also called Triệu Thị Trinh, although her actual given name is unknown. She is quoted as saying, “I’d like to ride storms, kill sharks in the open sea, drive out the aggressors, reconquer the country, undo the ties of serfdom, and never bend my back to be the concubine of whatever man.”

(Source: Wikipedia)